Bell`s Law Mis

Bell`s Law Mis

See also the various laws (e.g. Moore`s Law, Metcalfe`s Law) that describe the computer industry. [7] Established market-class computers, also known as platforms, are introduced and evolve at a roughly constant price (subject to lowering the learning curve) with increasing functionality (or performance) based on Moore`s Law, which provides more transistors per chip, more bits per unit area, or increased functionality per system. Approximately every ten years, technological advances in semiconductors, memory, networks, and interfaces enable the formation of a new class of lower-cost computing, also known as a platform, to meet a new need made possible by smaller devices, such as: Fewer transistors per chip, Lower-cost memory, displays, I/O, a network, and a single interface with people or another receiver or source of information processing. Each new, cheaper class is then established and maintained as a quasi-independent industry and market. Such a class is likely to evolve to replace one or more existing classes with clusters of computers as described above. Bell sees the law in part as a logical consequence of Moore`s Law, which states that „the number of transistors per chip doubles every 18 months.“ Unlike Moore`s Law, a new class of computer is usually based on less expensive components that have fewer transistors or fewer bits on a magnetic surface, etc. About every decade, a new class is formed. It also takes up to a decade to understand how the class was formed, evolved, and is likely to continue.

Once formed, a cheaper class can evolve in performance to take over and disrupt an existing class. This evolution resulted in scalable PC clusters with 1 to thousands of computers covering a range of prices and performance from a PC to mainframes to the largest supercomputers of the time. Scalable clusters became a universal class from the mid-1990s; By 2010, clusters of at least one million independent computers will form the largest cluster in the world. Bell`s Law on Computer Classes[1], formulated by Gordon Bell in 1972,[2] describes how types of computer systems (called computer classes) can form, evolve, and eventually disappear. New classes of computers create new applications that lead to new markets and industries. BCIS 3610 – Basic Information Systems – Manual Chapter 1 – The Importance of GIS – CLEAN Starting in the 1990s, a single class of scalable computers or megaservers (built from clusters ranging from a few to tens of thousands of ready-to-use microcomputer storage network stones) began to cover and replace mainframes, minis and workstations to become the largest computers of the time. And when used for scientific calculations, they are commonly referred to as supercomputers. [6] Bell`s Law on Computer Courses and Classroom Training was first mentioned in 1970 with the introduction of the PDP-11 digital mini-equipment to distinguish them from potentially emerging mainframes and microphones. The law was described by Gordon Bell in 1972. The emergence and observation of a new, cheaper class of microcomputers based on the microprocessor stimulated the creation of the law bell described in Bell`s articles and books. California State University, San Marcos • MGMT 302.

Paradise Valley Community College • MANAGAMENT MGT420.

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