Alto Definition Italian

Alto Definition Italian

From Old Portuguese, from the Latin altus, finally of Proto-Indo-European origin. This form is probably a half-scholarly term or was influenced by learned elements of the language and uses such spelling, as in Galician and Spanish Alt (which popularly inherited the outo and oto variants respectively). Once upon a time there was probably an *outo in Old Portuguese, which is not attested[1], but left a descendant inherited in Galician. See also outeiro, a related word. alto m (feminine singular alta, male plural altos, female plural altas) From the Latin altus, finally of Proto-Indo-European origin. The Alt form represents a pronunciation influenced by the most learned layers of the language, and is not the normal phonetic result expected in a naturally inherited word. Cf. the now archaic form oto, which was more commonly used in Old Spanish and is the form of the word, which was completely inherited in the vernacular language, is preserved in some toponyms/place names[1], and its derivation otear and the rare or regional otar[2]. Also compare the archaic Galician outo (compared to today`s standard alt). See also Spanish otero (and Portuguese outeiro). alto (comparative corn alto superlativ o mais alto) From the Latin altus („high“), from the Proto-Italic *altos, from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂eltós, derived from the root *h₂el- („to cultivate, to feed“). Related to Old English and Welsh allt. From Old Portuguese, from latin altus.

This form is probably half-learned or influenced by scholarly spelling, as in Old Portuguese and Old Spanish. also the now archaic form outo, which was probably inherited in the vernacular by a hypothetical undisputed Old Portuguese *outo, also preset in place names like Montouto („high hill“), from the same Latin word (cf. also Old Spanish oto). A shortening of the alternation or alternatief + -o. altō (present infinitive altāre); first conjugation, not a perfect or back rod.

Share this post